Jerusalem artichoke soup

This is my absolute favourite soup! I have fond memories of it as well. I started working as a waitress part-time at a small hotel in the countryside in the south of Sweden when I was at University in Lund. The hotel was a small manor house, really old and therefore very cold. In the winter it was freezing in the kitchen because it had so many outer walls. The chefs were really nice though, sometimes they made us the yummiest hot chocolate made of chocolate and cream, or Jerusalem artichoke soup with chopped schallots, which we ate gathered by the stove to get our body temperatures up. It wasn’t this cold in the restaurant, so the guests were fine actually.

This recipe is to serve the soup as a starter, but it’s great as a light supper as well, just make a little bit more, serve it with bread and maybe throw in some crispy bacon or some prawns in the soup, and maybe a dollop of creme fraiche. Enjoy!

Jerusalem artichoke soup, 2 portions

5 or so Jerusalem artichokes

100-150 ml cream

vegetable stock

chopped schallots

Peel the artichokes and cut them into equally sized pieces. Cover just, with water in a pan, sprinkle in some salt, bring to a boil and cook until very tender. Pour out some of the remaining water, and puree the rest with a stick blender. If this is too thick you can always add some of the water again, but it is difficult to make the soup thicker once it is liquidized. Pour in the cream, some stock, salt and white pepper and adjust the thickness with some of the remaining water if necessary. Bring to a boil again. Serve in bowls with some chopped schallots.

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This entry was posted in Quick suppers, Soup, Starters. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Jerusalem artichoke soup

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